Situations When Effective Odds
 
There are a few times when you do not have to consider future bets when assessing your pot odds. The first case occurs when either you or your opponent is all-in or almost all-in. Obviously, when your opponent has no more money to bet or you have no more money to call, the last card will be free. So all you need to do is observe your immediate pot odds and compare them to your chances of winding up with the best hand. In the example just given, if either you or your opponent were all-in when the opponent bet $10 on the flop and you called, it would be worth drawing to your back-door flush since it would now be a case of getting 26-to-1 on a 24-to-1 shot. However, you must remember that the chances of making the hand you are drawing to are not the same as your chances of winding up with the best hand. You might make your hand and still lose to a better hand. In the example just given, if either you or your opponent were all-in when the opponent bet $10 on the flop and you called, it would be worth drawing to your back-door flush since it would now be a case of getting 26-to-1 on a 24-to-1 shot. However, you must remember that the chances of winding up with the best hand. You might make your hand and still lose to a better hand.

There is a second case, similar to the first, when you might call in close situations even if your effective odds would indicate a fold. This comes up when you have good reason to think your opponent might check on the next round. If he does check, you are getting a free card just as though you or he were all-in. Once again all you need to consider are your immediate pot odds, since you expect to see two cards for the price of one. Such situations might come up when you suspect your opponent has a weak hand or when you think your opponent might fear to bet on the next round because he interprets your call to mean you're stronger than you really are, even when you don't catch the card you need.
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Avoid bad neighborhoods (2)
 
A college basketball player named Len Bias went number two in the 1986 NBA draft and died within days of a cocaine overdose. I have often speculated that Bias was thrilled about being the number two pick-but somehow not as thrilled as he felt he should have been; so he reinforced his buzz with cocaine, trying somehow to reach the level of ecstasy he supposed he was supposed to feel. I think about this when I book a tournament win and find myself asking, Okay, now what? Coming off a tournament high, I'm wired and pumped and happy and proud, and I'm strongly tempted to jump into a cash game, just to keep the high alive. Though the punishment for this mistake wouldn't be as severe for me as it was for Bias, I'd still be making my choice based on how I feel-how I want to keep on feeling-rather than on what's best for my poker and my bankroll. The sensible thing to do is to enjoy the victory and not try to make more of it than it is.

One could argue that coming off a tournament win, we're likely to be in a good game frame (a positive and productive state of mind) and could reasonably hope to parlay our tournament success into still more success in live action. This may be the case; however, you have to know for sure that you're jumping into that ring game to maximize your current edge, not to stretch the buzz. Remember: Focus on how you do, not on how you feel. This is the path to right mind.
 
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